History:

On December 10, 1909, two women, Eliza Gribble and her daughter Carrie Ohlander, were discovered beaten to death inside the house, while a third woman, Maggie Hunter, was found barely alive and later died from her injuries in the hospital. When police arrived on the scene, they found Carrie Ohlander’s body in the hallway, and concluded that she had been criminally assaulted before her throat was slit. Her mother, Eliza Gribble, was found in the back bedroom, her skull beaten in.Eliza Gribble, 70, was the owner of the house. She was originally from Cornwell, England, but had settled in Savannah before the Civil War with her late husband R. Gribble. She had rented the house with her daughter a short time before the murders occurred. Eliza was found sitting in her easy chair in the back bedroom. A newspaper and her reading glasses lay at her feet. She had received one to two blows to the back of the head, and her grey head showed the imprint of an ax. Carrie Ohlander, 36, was Eliza Gribble’s daughter. She was separated from her husband, Andrew J. Ohlander, who was living in Memphis, and had come to Savannah to live with her mother. Ohlander was partially deaf and believed to be the first to have been attacked, likely trying to protect her mother. Physicians determined she was criminally assaulted before having her throat cut and being beaten to death

Maggie Hunter, 34, had just rented a room and moved into the Gribble House the day before the attacks occurred. She was estranged from her husband, JC Hunter, who was 30 years her senior, at the time, and was planning on making a living on her own by being a seamstress. JC Hunter had just brought a sewing machine over to the house the day before the murders.

Maggie was found barely alive at the front door of the house with her throat slit and her head beaten in. She died three days later in the hospital.

Maggie Hunter, dying in the hospital,  revealed to a Baptist Minister, Reverend John S. Wilder, who was sitting at her bedside, the name of the killer. Maggie claimed that her husband, JC Hunter, was the one who struck her down. Police were notified, and Hunter was taken into custody after a search of his house revealed a bloody rag and bloody clothes.

On February 23, 1910, the Chatham County grand jury indicted three men, JC Hunter, Willie Walls, and John Coker, for the murder of the three women. All men denied any knowledge of the crimes. On August 17, 1910, the jury convicted Hunter of murder, and the court sentenced him to death by hanging. He tried to appeal his conviction and sentenced, but was denied, and his execution date was set for December 22, 1911.

In 1944, the Gribble House and surrounding buildings were torn down to build the 15,000 square foot warehouse that stands there now, located at 234 Martin Luther King Jr. Blvd in Savannah, Georgia. The warehouse is the site of ghost tours, and was featured on the 17 May 2014 of season 9 of the show Ghost Adventures.

Reported Activity:

Guests have seen everything from strange mists to shadows. A lot of voices and photographs of orbs to actual sightings of black shadows. The activity has been crazy. Some areas of the building are more paranormally active than others.

Each night, the Gribble House crew performs a two-hour investigation, allowing guests to become ghost hunters who use the latest, state-of-the-art equipment. Some guests claim to have experienced being touched, scratched and pushed, Some also have reported bouts of anxiety and headaches.

There are reports of spirits of children in the building. Audio recordings of a lot of profanity and things like, ‘Get out, leave, I’ll kill you.

Our Investigation:

Coming Soon!

If you’ve had a paranormal experience here, or have any additional information about this location, Please let us know.